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The Snakes of California

This article is a quick record of California's snakes, from the fastest to the slowest, least deadly to the deadliest, ect.

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The Snakes of California

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Have you ever wondered about the snakes here in California? I have, so I constructed a quick essay about the smallest, biggest, fastest, slowest, and all the other categories you could look for when looking for snakes for some reason or the other.

I am starting with the smallest and biggest snakes in California. The smallest snake in terms of length is the Brahminy blind snake or Indotyphlops braminus. It is so small it feeds on baby ants and can sometimes be confused with a big earthworm. This is the second smallest snake ever, only surpassed by the Barbados Thread Snake, the size of a quarter! On the flipside, the San Diego Gopher Snake is the biggest in Southern California. They can reach six feet in length, but are non-venomous and do not pose a threat to you most of the time. They mostly live in rodent holes, hence the name. Sometimes the Gopher Snake is confused for a rattlesnake because it hisses and shakes their tails when threatened and even have the same colors.

Second, I will tell you about the most common and most rare snakes found in California. Two honorable mentions for most common are the Gopher Snake, previously mentioned, and the Garter Snake, common all over the state and not deadly to humans. The most common is the coachwhip or red-racer. It is extremely fast and aggressive but not venomous. One of the rarest snakes found here in California is the Yellow-Bellied Sea Snake. It is highly venomous and not known to exist in California until this year. They are not known to bite humans unless you walk up to them and grab it.

Speaking of deadly snakes, now I will talk about the deadliest and least deadly snakes of California. I researched the subject of “least deadly snake in California” and found no such snake, due to this being an obscure topic. I did, however, manage to find the deadliest snake here, which is more important to know. It is the Western Diamondback, regarded as the deadliest in the state because of its aggression, venom, and size, reaching on average a length of four feet, but in some rare cases can go over six feet, exceeding the average for Gopher Snakes, the largest in California, as mentioned before.

Now for the least and most famous snakes. For the least famous, which is another totally obscure subject, I did not find one snake which is objectively the “least famous.” For the most famous, however, I guessed it was the rattlesnake. I could also not find one single species marked as “most famous in California.”, but the one pretty much most people know about is the rattlesnake.

It’s now time to talk about the slowest and the fastest. For the very slowest snake in California, I found the Rosy Boa, a slow snake that ironically can strike with great speed, along with precise accuracy, despite having to slowly stalk its prey. For the fastest, I assumed it was the Coachwhip or Red Racer, but I did not find any information of “Fastest snake in California”, which is surprising because I found information for the “slowest snake in California”.

This last paragraph will include all the notable snake species you might be able to find in California. The Coachwhip is an aggressive but nonvenomous snake that can bite very hard. The reason they attack this fast and aggressively is probably something to do with the fact that they are a non-venomous species. The Rubber Boa doesn’t do much worthy of note, but it looks like a fake snake made of rubber, as the name says. They live mostly in northern CA. The Common Sharp-tailed snake will most likely roll up into a ball when it first sees you. It also has a sharp tail, made obvious by the name. The appearance of the San Diego Ring-necked snake might look the most interesting. It is a concrete gray snake with a bright yellow belly and a ring of orange scales around its neck.

The only times I have seen a snake was once with a baby rattlesnake on a trail and twice with a Red Racer or Coachwhip in my backyard. My brother nearly stepped on it both times, but luckily it ran away pretty fast, which contributed to my assumption that it is the fastest in California. This has been my not that short article about snakes. Next, I will talk about more animals, or more specifically the pros and cons for proposition 12.

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